Havers Motor Car Co - Factory Photos

1913 Havers Roadster - factory photo
1913 Havers Touring - factory photo
I've written about the Havers Motor Car before as a friend owns two of these cars. Organized in Port Huron, Michigan in the spring of 1910 by brothers Fred and Ernest Havers, the Havers Motor Car Company sold their first production vehicles in 1911. The cars were originally manufactured in space acquired within the Port Huron Engine and Thresher Company facility, but in 1912 the Havers Motor Car Company purchased the former E-M-F factory (in Port Huron) after Studebaker acquired the E-M-F assets and moved them to Detroit.

As with many automobiles at that time, The Havers was an assembled car with major components sourced from quality producers of the day. The L-Head Continental engine inspired the name Six-44, as they were rated at 44 horsepower. Joined in 1913 by a Six-55, and for 1914 by an even larger Six-60, all Havers cars were six cylinders. On the night of July 7, 1914, a disastrous fire destroyed the factory complex. The company announced plans to rebuild, but creditor’s had their doubts and petitioned the court to have it adjudged bankrupt. The Havers company never recovered.

Havers Motor Car Co ad


The Havers factory before the fire
The photos shown here are from our friend with the cars and are interesting to study. Often in those years, manufacturers would advertise cars that they had not yet built (and sometimes never did). It is interesting to compare the ad to the finished cars. I estimate that Havers built no more than 1200 cars between 1910 and 1914 - before the factor burned. There are only 4 cars that are known to have survived - three touring cars (two 1912s & one 1913) and now a Knickerbocker speedster (built from a 1913 chassis and drivetrain to replicate the speedster). There are no known roadsters, but from these pictures we know that they actually made one.

7 comments:

  1. I have a photo of a 1912 Havers on the grounds of the factory in Port Huron. The photo has my grandfather (William J Morden Sr.) at the wheel. Grandpa worked for Havers at the time. Grandpa went on to own Morden Sales & Service the Studebaker Dealership.

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  2. Bill -

    Thank you for your comment - fascinating. Do you have any other information from your Grandfather's time with Havers? If you'd be willing email me a scan of the photo, I would happy post it here on the blog. email is vintagemotoring@gmail.com

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    1. I am the great-niece of Fred and Ernest Havers. My mother was named Ernestine Havers after Ernest as he and his wife, Carrie had no children. I have a pretty complete genealogy of the family.

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  3. I'd be interested in learning from anybody the background of Ernest Havers. Fred was a Port Huron resident and an agent for the Standard Oil Company, but Ernest remains largely a mystery, and I believe he was the chief designer. He's buried in Genesee County, and I'm assuming he had some connection with the car industry in Flint. Incidentally, the drawing of the Havers factory is preposterously overblown, as was typical of the day. It was a fraction of that size.

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    1. I am the great-niece of Fred and Ernest Havers. My mother was named Ernestine Havers after Ernest as he and his wife, Carrie had no children. I have a pretty complete genealogy of the family.

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  4. I am the great-niece of Fred and Ernest Havers. My mother was named Ernestine Havers after Ernest as he and his wife, Carrie had no children. I have a pretty complete genealogy of the family.

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  5. Jean Ann - Thank you for your comments. A close family friend owns two of the known remaining 4 Havers cars. I'd be happy to post any information or images of Fred or Ernest Havers that you may have. You can reach me at: vintagemotoring@gmail.com.

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